Film Office

History of film making in Gallup
El Rancho Hotel

The historic El Rancho Hotel & Motel has hosted a numerous array of movie stars including John Wayne, Ronald Reagan, Humphrey Bogart, Spencer Tracy, Katharine Hepburn, Joan Crawford, Kirk Douglas, Doris Day, Gregory Peck and Burt Lancaster. The rugged terrain surrounding Gallup was popular with Hollywood filmmakers during the 1940s and 50s for the on-location shooting of Westerns. Actors and film crews would stay at that hotel during filming. Films made in Gallup include Billy the Kid (1930), Pursued (1947), The Sea of Grass (1947), Four Faces West (1948), Only the Valiant(1951), Ace in the Hole (1951), Escape from Fort Bravo (1953), A Distant Trumpet (1964), and The Hallelujah Trail (1965).

Gallup is sometimes called the "Indian Capital of the World", for its location in the heart of Native American lands, and the presence of Navajo, Zuni, Hopi, and other tribes. One-third of the city's population has Native American roots. Gallup's nickname references the huge impact of the Native American cultures found in and around the city.

In 2013, Gallup was named by Rand McNally as the "Most Patriotic Small Town in America 2013."

New Mexico Film Office



The historic El Rancho Hotel & Motel has hosted a numerous array of movie stars including John WayneRonald ReaganHumphrey BogartSpencer TracyKatharine Hepburn,Joan CrawfordKirk DouglasDoris DayGregory Peck, and Burt Lancaster. The rugged terrain surrounding Gallup was popular with Hollywood filmmakers during the 1940s and 50s for the on-location shooting of Westerns. Actors and film crews would stay at that hotel during filming. Films made in Gallup include Billy the Kid (1930), Pursued (1947), The Sea of Grass (1947), Four Faces West (1948), Only the Valiant (1951), Ace in the Hole (1951), Escape from Fort Bravo (1953), A Distant Trumpet (1964), and The Hallelujah Trail(1965).

Gallup is sometimes called the "Indian Capital of the World", for its location in the heart of Native American lands, and the presence of NavajoZuniHopi, and other tribes. 1/3 of the city's population has Native American roots. Gallup's nickname references the huge impact of the Native American cultures found in and around the city.

In 2013, Gallup was named by Rand McNally as the "Most Patriotic Small Town in America 2013."[5]

The historic El Rancho Hotel & Motel has hosted a numerous array of movie stars including John WayneRonald ReaganHumphrey BogartSpencer TracyKatharine Hepburn,Joan CrawfordKirk DouglasDoris DayGregory Peck, and Burt Lancaster. The rugged terrain surrounding Gallup was popular with Hollywood filmmakers during the 1940s and 50s for the on-location shooting of Westerns. Actors and film crews would stay at that hotel during filming. Films made in Gallup include Billy the Kid (1930), Pursued (1947), The Sea of Grass (1947), Four Faces West (1948), Only the Valiant (1951), Ace in the Hole (1951), Escape from Fort Bravo (1953), A Distant Trumpet (1964), and The Hallelujah Trail(1965).

Gallup is sometimes called the "Indian Capital of the World", for its location in the heart of Native American lands, and the presence of NavajoZuniHopi, and other tribes. 1/3 of the city's population has Native American roots. Gallup's nickname references the huge impact of the Native American cultures found in and around the city.

In 2013, Gallup was named by Rand McNally as the "Most Patriotic Small Town in America 2013."[5]

The historic El Rancho Hotel & Motel has hosted a numerous array of movie stars including John WayneRonald ReaganHumphrey BogartSpencer TracyKatharine Hepburn,Joan CrawfordKirk DouglasDoris DayGregory Peck, and Burt Lancaster. The rugged terrain surrounding Gallup was popular with Hollywood filmmakers during the 1940s and 50s for the on-location shooting of Westerns. Actors and film crews would stay at that hotel during filming. Films made in Gallup include Billy the Kid (1930), Pursued (1947), The Sea of Grass (1947), Four Faces West (1948), Only the Valiant (1951), Ace in the Hole (1951), Escape from Fort Bravo (1953), A Distant Trumpet (1964), and The Hallelujah Trail(1965).

Gallup is sometimes called the "Indian Capital of the World", for its location in the heart of Native American lands, and the presence of NavajoZuniHopi, and other tribes. 1/3 of the city's population has Native American roots. Gallup's nickname references the huge impact of the Native American cultures found in and around the city.

In 2013, Gallup was named by Rand McNally as the "Most Patriotic Small Town in America 2013."[5]